Monday, September 21, 2009

Podcasts From Parchment to Pixel

The British Library offers five podcasts connected to the Codex Sinaiticus project and the exhibition From Parchment to Pixel:

Juan Garcés on Codex Sinaiticus 12 minutes

Juan Garcés, Curator for the Codex Sinaiticus Project at the British Library, talks about the curious past and exciting future of this remarkable manuscript: one of the oldest two complete Bibles in existence, possibly commissioned by Constantine in the [fourth] century as a 'master copy' for all Bibles.

The re-unification of Codex Sinaiticus in four parts (10+7+7+11 minutes)
Part 1
Juan Garcés of the British Library talks to Amy Myshrall, one of the team who helped create the digitised Codex Sinaiticus - probably the earliest surviving Bible in the world.

Part 2
Juan Garcés of the British Library talks to Timothy Arthur Brown, one of the team who helped create the digitised Codex Sinaiticus.

Part 3
Juan Garcés of the British Library talks to David Parker of the University of Birmingham, one of the team who helped create the digitised Codex Sinaiticus..

Part 4
Juan Garcés of the British Library talks to Rachel Kevern of the University of Birmingham, one of the team who helped create the digitised Codex Sinaiticus.

7 Comments:

Anonymous said...

"possibly commissioned by Constantine in the fifth century"

Perhaps this should be corrected to fourth century

Matthew Hamilton

Tommy Wasserman said...

Thanks Matthew. I did not pay enough attention, but just copied the text from BL. The corrected date is now in square brackets.

Peter M. Head said...

Probably the connection to Constantine should be deleted since it is impossible.

Tommy Wasserman said...

PMH: "Probably the connection to Constantine should be deleted since it is impossible."

Don't blame me. I am citing the description of BL/Juan Garcés. I haven't listened to the podcast yet, but probably Garcés discusses the issue of origin.

Peter M. Head said...

Sorry Tommy,
I wasn't meaning to blame you. I was just making a comment.

Anonymous said...

P. Head:

Why would it be impossible for Constantine to have commissioned it? From the time of the commission to the time of completion would be quite some time, right?

Just wondering. I am not at all trained in TC.

Peter M. Head said...

Constantine commissioned Eusebius to provide fifty Bibles for Constantinople because churches lacked Bibles because of the destruction of texts in persecution. In general I have no problem with aligning Sinaiticus very generally with a similar impulse, but there is nothing to associate Sinaiticus with Constantinople, and the handling of the Eusebian numbering system seems to preclude Eusebius' personal involvement (this is a Jongkind argument).