Monday, May 19, 2008

New Uncial Manuscript of John

CHÉTANIAN, R. Varteni & STONE, Michael E., 'Deux pages d'un même manuscrit grec de l'Évangile selon Jean dans deux manuscrits arméniens' Revue des Études Arméniennes 30 (2005-2007), 419-432.

This article publishes two pages from the same ninth century greek manuscript of John (majuscule) from two different Armenian manuscripts. Some basic details of the two pages:

Chester Beatty 624 (An Armenian manuscript of the four gospels written in Antioch in AD 1811): page from the binding: John 16.27 - 17.9

Matenadaran (Erevan, Russia) (Frag. 15 in an envelope): John 17.24 - 18.11

General discussion of the fragments, really nice photos.

11 Comments:

Wieland Willker said...

And?

The White Man said...

I don't understand. Is this a Greek portion of an otherwise Armenian ms?

There's a TC joke on my blog today.

Tommy Wasserman said...

The White Man: "Is this a Greek portion of an otherwise Armenian ms?"

Without having read the article, I suppose from what Peter writes that a portion of a Greek MS has been used in the binding of later Armenian MS.

I have found two different uncial MSS in this way. One has been registered as L2435. The other is still awaiting registration.

Peter M. Head said...

WW: And nothing. Just for information. Some people may be interested in a new ms.


WM: I said: "This article publishes two pages from the same ninth century greek manuscript of John (majuscule) from two different Armenian manuscripts."
You said: "I don't understand. Is this a Greek portion of an otherwise Armenian ms?"
I say: "Yes, this article publishes two pages from the same ninth century greek manuscript of John (majuscule) from two different Armenian manuscripts."

Wieland Willker said...

Anything noteworthy, I mean.
Or just Byz text?

Peter M. Head said...

WW: I have only had a look at one page in detail. Not helped by the fact that the authors collate the manuscript against only N24 and NA27 - so in most cases they have exactly the same text. But, in three clear places this follows Byz readings over against the NA type text: 18.1: O IHSOUS; 18.1: TWN KEDRWN; 18.2: O IHSOUS. This continues in other passages (no plate): 18.3: KAI FARISAIWN; 18.4: EXELQWN EIPEN; 18.6: OTI; 18.7: AUTOUS EPHRWTHSEN; 18.10: WTION. So that looks pretty solidly Byz to me.

There is an interesting phenomena in the second photo. On this page we have 18.1 then a major break and then a new introduction to a repetition of 18.1, then 18.2-3 etc. This is introduced with TW KAIRW EKEINW EXHLQEN O IHSOUS KAI OI MAQHTAI AUTOU PERAN TOU CEIMARROU ...

I don't know where this comes from (partly perhaps Mark 8.27); although a scribe has headed this section: 'from [the gospel] according to Matthew'.

Curiously, this makes it look a bit like a lectionary text, even though all the other indications are that it is a continuous text of John.

maurice a robinson said...

PH: This is introduced with TW KAIRW EKEINW EXHLQEN O IHSOUS KAI OI MAQHTAI AUTOU PERAN TOU CEIMARROU ...

This is simply the "normal" Lectionary introduction to the Second Gospel of the Passion, except, according to the AD edition, SUN should be read in place of KAI.

The MS may simply have been rubricated for lectionary purposes while remaining otherwise continuous; this would particularly be typical of the Kr variety of continuous text MSS.

However...if this is indeed a lectionary fragment, the immediately preceding First Gospel of the Passion actually concludes with Jn 18:1, which fits Dr Head's description. This makes it sound very strongly like a lectionary leaf (for which all the Byzantine readings noted are typical)

Without having seen the photos, I can't say much more.

Daniel Buck said...

"Erevan, Russia" is an interesting geographical anachronism. The official website reads:

"The Matenadaran after St. Mesrop Mashtotz is a scientific research institute of old manuscripts at the Government of the Republic of Armenia. It is located in the Armenian capital Yerevan."

Peter M. Head said...

Based on Maurice's comment this is therefore most likely a lectionary text. I have to plead a fair bit of ignorance on such things I'm afraid. Where do we find the 'normal' lectionary readings?

Also I plead a fair bit of ignorance in the current location of Erevan. I simply picked it up from an older source.

maurice a robinson said...

PH: Where do we find the 'normal' lectionary readings?

Aside from collating lectionary MSS and arriving at a general consensus, the "TR" of the Greek Orthodox lectionary readings is basically the "Apostolike Diakone" edition, published in Athens (my edition being from 1979). This edition is cited in UBS4 as AD, described on pp. 19*-20* of that edition.

James Snapp, Jr. said...

PMH,

You can also find the "normal" Byzantine lectionary-readings on pages 771-780 in The Orthodox Study Bible, NKJV NT & Psalms.