Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Quiz: who said this?

'To many the study of Textual Criticism is wearisome and distasteful. The laborious nature of the methods employed, the apparent uncertainty of the results arrived at, the comparative unimportance of the problems to be dealt with, as contrasted with those of the Higher Criticism which face us on every side, all tend to deter from its pursuit. But it is only through those methods what we have reached the conclusion that by far the greater portion of the New Testament texts rests on a foundation more solid than that of any other ancient writing, and no further trouble can be ill spent that helps to increasee out knowledge of the Book which contains the revelation of God's love to man.'

12 Comments:

Eric Rowe said...

OK, you better lay down a rule for votes/day. Otherwise, I have two guesses now, and I may be tempted to give both before others get a chance.

I'll start with my first guess:
Tregelles.

Peter M. Head said...

Eric,

No need for rules. This one is too hard for anyone to guess.

Peter M. Head said...

By the way, Tregelles is a no. (broadly similar era and language/style; but Tregelles usually went for rather more positive and specific theological points when he made them).

John C. Poirier said...

Might it be Newman? Or perhaps Arnold?

Peter M. Head said...

no, no.

Jan Krans said...

My first guess (sorry, Peter) would be Kenyon; my second, Scrivener.

Shaun Tabatt said...

This is from an essay titled: The History and Present State of New Testament Textual Criticism by Alfred Valentine Valentine-Richards, M.A.

Peter M. Head said...

Jan: no, no.

Peter M. Head said...

Shaun: yes. I confess I have never heard of him before I took a quick look at this essay the other day. Very important in the history of Cambridge mountaineering.

Anonymous said...

Peter,

Was it Westoctt?

Peter M. Head said...

Anonymous: no.

Anonymous said...

"What is Westcott?" Alex Trevek would be pleased though! An aspiring future Jepordy champion?

Malcolm