Evangelical Textual Criticism

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Greek Fragment of the Testamentum Domini

In 2005 I published an article: ‘An Unidentified Theological Fragment from the Fifth Century in a Private Collection in Cambridge (de Hamel MS 373)’ Tyndale Bulletin 56 (2005), 35-38. This article dealt with the document that is pictured here, offering a transcription, and suggested it was a Christian text dealing with church order, but one which I had been unable to identify (hence the title!).
Recently two scholars who have been working on the Latin texts purchased with this Greek text have argued (I think persuasively) that this fragment represents a piece of the only surviving Greek manuscript of the Testamentum Domini (for some of the back story see here and here).

S. Corcoran, & B. Salway, ‘A Newly Identified Greek Fragment of the Testamentum DominiJournal of Theological Studies 62 (2011), 118-135. So kudos to them for solving the mystery - an excellent outcome all round.

20 comments:

  1. This makes up as well for Tommy's savaging in the same issue of JTS.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amazing actually that two articles in the same journal reflects such progress over your work.

    ReplyDelete
  3. One is progress, the other is regress.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looking forward to the rejoinder.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I thought I was an old feature.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I shouldn't have tested that here – should have picked an old comment thread :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh, you mean it wasn't an insult after all. That is a relief.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Tommy, everyone else has gone, only you and I are left.

    ReplyDelete
  9. New feature finally working.

    ReplyDelete
  10. So what is the new feature - Tommy can comment anonymously? (I figured that one out long ago)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Pete, no I did not comment anonymously, I never do.

    The new feature is this: http://www.9lessons.info/2011/02/facebook-comments-plugin-for-wordpress.html

    I think I should maybe make a poll among readers to see if they want us to try a facebook comment box (instead of this comment area). This will mean that when you comment on a blogpost you have the option to simultaneously show the comment on your facebookpage. (People without facebook can still make comments.) This could increase interaction and we would likely break the Peter-Head-barrier (50 comments) more often. But there may be some drawbacks.

    I tried out the feature today just for fun, so I know how to add it to this blog. We could always try it out and the revert.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I remember this, vaguely. I remember not identifying the text.

    So . . . since there's something about lector-ordination in Test.Dom., should this be considered extra evidence of a developed Greek lection-system existing somewhere in the 400's?

    Yours in Christ,

    James Snapp, Jr.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Tommy: ...a poll among readers to see if they want us to try a facebook comment box (instead of this comment area).

    Some of us non-techno-geeks don't use Facebook, nor do we Text, Tweet, or Twitter...We Luddites are mostly much happier that way.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Maurice, it was for you Luddites I wrote: "People without facebook can still make comments."

    So what's the difference? People with facebook can choose whether or not they want their friends to see what they comment on. People without facebook comment as usual.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi, where did my explanation go? Several comments disappeared. The new feature was a facebook comment box, so that those with facebook can choose whether they want their comment on the blog to be visible in their facebook log. People without facebook can comment as usual. I tried this out earlier this week, during a few minutes. We could always run a trial.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Tommy: where did my explanation go? Several comments disappeared.

    Indeed -- including my comment about some of us prehistoric Luddites who as much as possible avoid computerized "new" technologies in order to avoid losing information as well as to avoid making ourselves appear foolish on more than a single venue at a time.

    For the record (as stated in my "lost" post): I don't Text, Tweet, Twitter or do Facebook, MySpace or any similar time-consuming non-essential activity. Really, I'm much happier that way.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Dear Maurice, I say the same. Where did my comment (reply to your comment) go? I replied with a reference to my previous comment, that you Luddites who did not use Facebook would make comments as usual - no difference there! So what was the difference? Those who use Facebook could choose the option to make their comments on this blog visible for their Facebook contacts.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Tommy: I say the same. Where did my comment (reply to your comment) go?

    I believe it was (temporarily) raptured into cyberspace....

    But now it has returned, perhaps due to the failure of the otherwise predicted events.

    ReplyDelete