Tuesday, February 15, 2011

The Reliability of the New Testament

Papers from the Greer-Heard Forum in 2010 (noted then here and here) have now been published in:
The Reliability of the New Testament: Bart Ehrman and Daniel Wallace in Dialogue, ed. Robert B. Stewart (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2011).
Among samples available on the Fortress website is chapter one, a transcript of the original debate between Ehrman and Wallace. Other chapters are by Holmes, Martin, Parker, Warren, Heide, Evans, Raquel. (These I have not seen as yet.)

For a brief discussion of Martin Heide's paper, “Assessing the Stability of the Transmitted Texts of the New Testament and the Shepherd of Hermas”, (pp. 111-145) see Larry Hurtado's Blog.

7 Comments:

Frederik Mulder said...

Thank you Peter. This one I'll just have to buy.
Frederik

Peter M. Head said...

Once it arrives, will you let me have a look?

Frederik Mulder said...

OK

P.J. Williams said...

Congrats to Martin. It's a great article. Hurtado is right about it being interesting (in a positive sense). I hope it becomes a classic.

Frederik Mulder said...

Martin is not just a world-class expert when it comes to ancient languages etc, he is also a humble and devoted Christian. His time here at Tyndale was memorable.

Steven Avery said...

Hi,

On the K. Martin Heide pape:

It is hard to imagine that the sampling size of Hermas could allow for any meaningful comparison that could be extrapolated to any conclusions.

After all, there are only two fairly full Greek manuscripts of Hermas. Even if you are allowing the Sinaiticus portion to be unrelated to the Latin-influenced Simonides section.

There simply is not enough data for a comparison to reach any conclusions.

Steven

Steven Avery said...

Hi,

Ok, I saw on another thread that there are a number of Hermas papyri partials that are compared. And they are compared to comparable NT papyri.

The concern is that the whole study is one localized, rather wild, area in terms of scribal habits. Which gives results that have limited extrapolation. Even Aland warns about the gnostic influence in the Egyptian making such studies a bit problematic.

Steven