Thursday, May 27, 2010

GA 086

The majority of Gregory-Aland 086 is currently held in the British Library. This summer I will be studying this palimpsest manuscript for my dissertation as it contains both Greek and Fayumic texts of John in its scriptio inferior. The manuscript was reused for a variety of purposes. The thirteen British Library leaves were reused for mathematical problems, and have recently been conserved and imaged with state-of-the-art technology (Coppen-Jacobs, 2009). Their original publicationis available online (Crum, JTS 1:3 [1900]:415-433).

The image above was published by Henri Munier, and identified by Crum as a further page of the same manuscript. The scriptio superior is a martyrdom. Siegfried Richter (Münster) identified this manuscript (CM 3890) at the Coptic Museum. Current transcriptions have been made only from the sepia photograph publish by Munier (above). The Munier edition is public domain, and can be downloaded, here.

I hope to make ultraviolet images of the manuscript, and also to share the images with my IGNTP collaborators in Münster and Birmingham. I believe that I have found a further leaf of 086 in another European library containing Mark, but it will be some time before I can say more. More on ultraviolet photography, soon.

4 Comments:

Tommy Wasserman said...

I get so depressed by all these "spam-comments" totally irrelevant to the main post, recently a guy named "Rev Robert Wright" has sent us the same long comment on many post indicating his "general interest", trying to attract people to his website.

If Rev Wright reads this (I have tried to e-mail him without success), I hope he reconsiders his netbehaviour.

Tommy Wasserman said...

(I deleted his comment.)

Anonymous said...

Christian wrote in his earlier post: "I hope to produce new images of a largely unedited Greek-Coptic New Testament manuscript." If this refers to 086, is it "largely unedited"? Or is it something else?

Christian Askeland said...

I should have said images of a manuscript page which is largely unedited. The British Library pages are edited, but the Coptic Museum page is only partially edited based on a poor image of one side of the leaf.