Monday, March 09, 2015

Helpful Website on English Translations of the Bible

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I recently came across a website called the Internet Bible Catalog. Notwithstanding that mis-spelling of “catalogue” I found this a useful resource in tracking down both a particular edition of an English translation of the NT, and also earlier and later editions of the same. It is run mostly by and for collectors, rather than scholars (so better on translations than Hebrew and Greek editions). Here is what they say about themselves:
The Internet Bible Catalog is a web-based catalog of printed editions of the Bible. Its primary focus is on English language translations, but it has many entries for Bibles in the original languages and in non-English versions. The Catalog welcomes participation from the larger community of Bible Collectors. Members are encouraged to add and correct entries.
The Internet Bible Catalog is different from printed catalogs in that it includes images of the Bibles. For almost all entries, the title page is included and many entries include covers, jackets, or representative pages. Another unique feature is the inclusion of sample verses; a representative sample of verses from a given version.
For example, have a look at the impressive list of different English translations

8 comments :

  1. I would like to assume that your comment concerning the spelling of "catalog" was added tongue-in-cheek from the perspective of one teaching at Cambridge who simply couldn't resist the shot across the bow! Any online dictionary, including the Oxford English Dictionary (and other sources such as the Library of Congress) will substantiate this as an acceptable, and not at all unusual alternative spelling. I would put you on notice that we employ American English here, and since you lost the Revolutionary War, you might as well get used to it!

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  2. Yes, thanks Jack; I agree that did look an unnecessary comment when I re-read the post this morning. I'm glad you took it in the teasing tongue-in-cheek manner it was intended.

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  3. Do Australians even care who won the American War for Independence?
    I'm not sure all of them even know who won....

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  4. I think on spelling we are generally more on the English side than the US side. And we never had to fight a war for independence from the English. Except in the sense that sport (esp. cricket and rugby) is a substitute for war.

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  5. What do they call the "American Revolution" in England anyway?

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  6. Doesn't seem to make much of an impact. As far as I can tell history in UK schools covers 1930-1945 in different ways just about every year.
    http://ask.metafilter.com/26058/How-do-British-refer-to-the-American-Revolution

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  7. Along with fresh in addition to groundbreaking techniques giving simpler alternatives, it's getting less of a challenge to get skilled products and services Professional Translation Online there.

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