Monday, February 16, 2015

Vaticanus Online

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The whole of Codex Vaticanus (OT and NT) now online.

http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Vat.gr.1209

For background on the wider project (digital images of all 80,000 manuscripts in the Vatican Library), see here

12 comments :

  1. Tregelles would be highly pleased....

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    1. yes, how many months did he wait in Rome trying to get a proper look at it?

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  2. Yay!
    What's all that in the margins at the beginning of Daniel?

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  3. Some more marginalia is in the upper margin of the page on which Judith begins, partly trimmed away.

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  4. The signature of Klement (??) the Monk, which appears only faintly at the end of Deuteronomy, appears clearly on page 624, before Psalms.

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  5. The images are much clearer than in the facsimile.
    Great!
    I have several palaeographical problems in the TCG commentary that I have to recheck now.

    For downloading the images, have a look here:
    http://textual-criticism.blogspot.de/

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  6. sorry lay man here. But what is the story with the script used in Genesis. Ive never seen the like of it. I can't even tell if its greek or Hebrew or latin.

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    1. Greetings your alien holiness. Greek, fifteenth century style (like the book of Revelation) - fixing up some of the gaps in the codex.

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  7. Finally we won't need a microscope anymore to look at marginal dots.

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  8. Comparing the Stephanus GNT to the Hort & Westcott GNT one finds:

    - virtually 100% of the difference in the Greek that change meaning are located in doctrinal verses only, not purely narratives, which are virtually identical (Modern verse numbering), indicating changes are deliberate, not "mistakes"
    - the differences in the Hort and Westcott are almost 3000 verses that are uniquely Catholic doctrine accommodations, and another 300 that are arian and gnostic accommodations.

    If anything, the Sinaiticus and Vaticanus represent "the oldest and best Catholic, arian and gnostic" mss. Furthermore, these two older editions were written over many times by scribes changing the Greek words to accommodate these doctrines, and the changes are dated much newer than the 4th or 5th century.

    So if you are Catholic, you can use most any modern translation, as most are approved by the Catholic church. But if you want to live "by every Word God" that comes out of His mouth, then you should avoid virtually all modern translations, since thousands of words were removed to accommodate Catholic doctrine.

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