Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Malik on Corrections in Sinaiticus

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Peter Malik, 'The Earliest Corrections in Codex Sinaiticus: A Test Case from the Gospel of Mark' Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists 50(2013), 207-254.

Abstract: One of the most intriguing aspects of the production of Codex Sinaiticus is the corrections made at various stages in the scriptorium. Perhaps surprisingly, no one has yet undertaken to identify these corrections by scribal hands that authored them and by the correction stage at which they were made. Using Mark’s Gospel as a test case, the present study seeks to assign the known scribal hands and the appropriate correction stages to these earliest corrections. After scrutinizing the individual corrections, I shall make some general comments concerning the correcting activity of the scribes in this portion of the manuscript, including a brief discussion of the textual affinities of (some of) the corrections.

Congratulations to Peter. This is an interesting study, based on a recent Cambridge MPhil. Among many other things, it has a helpful discussion of the situation at Mark 1.1 (p. 214-219). Incidentally, it also shows the sorts of things that PhD students should be publishing (cf. the discussion here).

5 comments :

  1. Thanks for the shout, Peter and, most of all, for your patient supervision!

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  2. A very fine article, by a budding scholar. (Although, in my opinion,the particular part on Mk 1:1 could be improved, as I have told the author.)

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  3. Congrats, Peter! (... and the other Peter must be very proud, too) :)

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  4. Thanks, Tommy, and thank you for steering me towards the Sinaiticus corrections when I embarked on my M.Phil.!

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  5. Hi,

    Peter, an interesting question arose with your fourth variant study, Mark 2:22, which is generally said to be corrected in the scriptorium (along with many other corrections by the same scribe).

    We are discussing this on Facebook, it certainly looks like the corrector uses a lower case beta, a letter form that afawk did not exist until centuries later.

    This should lead to the thread on Facebook with a pic.
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/11404207692/permalink/10151846573252693/?stream_ref=2

    Steven Avery

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